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I really enjoy blogging.  Not only does it give me the ability to interact and share my knowledge with my incredible readers (yes, you!!), it also at times throws up at times some pretty amazing opportunities. A couple of weeks ago one of these astounding opportunities hit my email inbox. It was an email from Holly Wainwright Editor of Mamamia!!! Yes the Mamamia, Australia’s premier website for women!!! Holly said that she had read my blog and was wondering if I would be interested in joining her and Andrew Daddo discuss pocket money on Mamamia’s popular parenting podcast “This Glorious Mess”.

“YES!!!” was my swift response!! Let’s face it, no one wants to reject the opportunity to be in the same room as a Daddo!!! 🙂  So before I knew it I found myself in a recording studio chatting pocket money with Holly and Andrew!!! It was an amazing experience.  I was super nervous and it was waaaaaayyyyyyyyy out of my comfort zone but Holly and Andrew made it heaps of fun!

So without further ado here is episode 6 of the pod cast of “This Glorious Mess” with Holly Wainwright, Andrew Daddo and myself talking pocket money!!! (I am in the middle after their chat about Mothers day 🙂

Click here to hear me on “This Glorious Mess” talking pocket money.

Oh and the pic above is the obligatory selfie of the three of us in the studio!

Have a great day!

 

Shelley

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If you would like to read more from me don’t forget to sign up to my weekly email using the form below:



Disclaimer:

The information contained in this post is general in nature and does not constitute financial advice.  Please see your financial advisor for advice specific to your individual circumstances.

10/05/2015 6 comments
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Nimble MoneyMe

I am sure you have seen the ads on TV: having problems with paying your gas bill/phone bill/car repairs/nursery for your new baby?  “Why don’t you Nimble it?” says the guy dressed in a rabbit suit.  Nimble call themselves “smart little loans” but in reality there is nothing smart about them, as behind the humor and quirky advertising, lurks the most insidious form of lending the ‘payday loan’.

But what is a ‘payday loan’?  Typically a payday loan is for a small amount of money, usually less than $2,000 and which is lent for only a short period of time.  Traditionally it was until your next payday and hence the name.  The other trademark of a ‘payday loan’ is the extra ordinate interest and fees interest they charge.   In Australia, fees are regulated at 20% of the value of the loan and a maximum interest rate of 4% per month.  Yes, you are right 4% per month is 48% per year!  So if you borrow a $1000 over 6 weeks it will cost you $1,280 in interest and fees!!!  And that is just for 6 weeks!!!  Worse, in the case of Nimble if you miss a repayment they will spank you with $35 fee and $7 a day until you have cleared the debt.  Yep, they don’t tell you all of that in the cutesy hipster advertising.  Now you understand why it is so easy to get yourself into trouble using this form of lending.

To help you get trapped in a cycle of debt Nimble will even put your hugely expensive loan directly onto a Nimble prepaid visa card for you – just to make sure it is even easier to spend!  And to apply for these incredibly expensive loans all you need is the Nimble app on your mobile phone or internet access on your home computer.

And this is what makes me fear for our children.  You see the clever, soft, hipster advertising isn’t aimed at me, a 40 something  mother, it is aimed at young people who are unaware of the danger that this type of lending represents.  Combined with easy access over the internet or an app on your phone, these types of loans have become far easier to access and more socially acceptable than ever before.  That has got to scare any parent.  No-one wants to see their son or daughter trapped in a debilitating cycle of debt, taking out loans to repay loans, where the horrendous interest costs and fees cripple any chance to clear the debt.

So what are the alternatives to a payday loan?

  • Ask yourself the question “Do you really need it?????” Are you absolutely sure you cannot do without it? Are there other ways to achieve the same goal?
  • If you need the money to pay a bill as the adverts suggest, make sure you negotiate with the supplier first. All utilities, whether you are talking about your telephone, electricity, water or gas bills have hardship programs you can utilise to get the bill paid without incurring more debt.
  • If you are on low income and qualify, you could take out a No Interest Loan (NILS). If you are interested in finding out more please click here.
  • If you are on Centrelink, see if you can receive an advance.
  • Talk to your family and friends and see if they can help you. Usually I don’t believe in mixing family and money but when it comes to payday lending it is a far better alternative than paying extortionate rates of interest and fees.

It is important to know that Nimble and MoneyMe are not the only guises of the payday lending blight in Australia.  Cash Converters, Cash Train and Cash Stop are all payday lenders and so is pretty much anyone else who offers easy short term loans, hipster advertising or not.

So as your child approaches adulthood make sure you talk to them about payday loans and all their different guises.  Tell them about all the things that the snazzy advertising and bouncy jingles forget to mention like the high fees and huge interest rates these loans attract and how easy it is to slip into a cycle of debt.  If they don’t believe you, as most teenagers don’t, tell them to check out this youtube video from “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”, it is a comedic view of the horrors the payday lending industry have unleashed on the US.  It is exceptionally well done and well worth a watch for both parents and children (though the language gets a bit colorful at the end!).

 

 

I know that when my daughter is old enough, she will be watching it and  I will be telling her all about how payday lending works.   It is only through knowledge and education that we can protect our kids from this insidious form of lending.

p.s If you have a problem with payday lending a Financial Counsellors can help you, call 1800 007 007 Australia wide to hook up with one in your area.  Their service is completely free.

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If you would like to read more from me in 2015 don’t forget to sign up to my weekly email using the form below:




Disclaimer:

The information contained in this post is general in nature and does not constitute financial advice.  Please see your financial advisor for advice specific to your individual circumstances.

17/01/2015 11 comments
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How to teach your kids about money

There are so many things I want to teach my daughter but money smarts is very close to the top of my list.  It is an essential life skill and I am very aware that it is my responsibility to teach her.  Many parents feel the same way, and I often get asked “What is the best way to teach my child about money?”   The truth is, like with many things, there is no one correct way.  Each child is an individual and some ways will work well with some kids, but not with others.

I believe there are two essential elements you need to help your children learn about money: you need to talk to them about it and you need to show them about it.  The following are some practical ideas of how you can combine talking and showing, to give your children a solid real-world foundation in the art of handling their own finances.  Here are some ideas are roughly split by age group but some ideas span ages groups and some children might be ready for older concepts at a younger age.  It is an entirely individual process so take the ideas that suit you, your family and your beliefs about money.

3-5 years old

  • Buy them a money-box in which you put some spare change.  Take out the money do some basic counting.  Talk about the differences between the coins, shapes, numbers.   Once they are a bit older, introduce notes and discuss the differences between notes and coins.
  • Play shops.  My daughter loves this.  We even use loose coins from my wallet to “pay” for things.  I ask her how much things cost.  Mind you everything costs either $2 or $30 according to her!  We will work on some more realistic pricing when she is older 🙂
  • Explain why you, your partner or both of you, go to work.
  • Give them $2 or $5 to spend at the supermarket, so they can see how much they can purchase.  This used to be a lot more fun when lollies were 2c or 5c at the local Milk Bar!
  • Start to talk to them about the difference between the things they need and the things they want.
  • Start to talk about how much things cost, they are still very young and they won’t really understand it for a while but it helps to start the conversation.
  • Introduce the idea of pocket money when you think they are old enough to understand it.  You could set age appropriate tasks and have a chart to tick off when a task is done.
  • Help them to start thinking of saving for something they want to buy.  Get them to put aside some money in a jar or money-box to work towards their goal.
  • You are probably like me and you rarely visit a bank branch.  However, opening a bank account for each child and taking them to the bank to make deposits, is a great opportunity to explain to them how the bank works.  (Remember beware of the high tax rates on kids savings after certain thresholds.  Click here to find out more)
  • Start to talk about the ATM and where the money actually comes from, that it doesn’t just magically appear from a hole in the wall.

5-13 years old

  • Consider saving as a family for something fun like a visit to the zoo or local theme park.  Figure out together how much you need then create a plan to save for it.
  • Set up a business for a day such as a Lemonade Stand, or help them set up their own small business for family and friends such as dog walking, babysitting or lawn mowing.  This allows them to understand some of the mechanics of earning money in the real world.
  • Bring them to work for a day.  It gives them a better understanding of where the money actually comes from.
  • Have a garage sale or car boot sale, where your child sells a small number of items that they have chosen.  Help them to set the prices and then they decide what happens to the money once they have earned it.  Talk through their options in terms of spending versus saving.
  • Talk about purchasing items without cash, how items are paid for and where the actually money comes from.  Parents often use their cards so it is difficult for children to understand the relationship between physical money and putting a card in a machine.
  • Give children a set daily allowance for holiday spending and get them to figure out how much things cost, whether they can afford it and how much change they should expect.
  • Understanding the value of money – talk about making choices with your money, buying things on sale versus paying full price, spending versus saving, bringing your lunch from home versus buying take-away.
  • Get them to write a list of things that they need and things that they want.  Explain that sometimes you have to wait to get the things that you want and save for them.
  • Discuss ways to save money around the house such as turning off the lights or the heater.

13-18 years old

  • Once they are old enough encourage them to get a job part-time job or work over the summer holidays.  My husband dug graves and cleaned offices during his formative years and I worked in a library.  Having a job teaches you not only about money but more importantly about the politics of the work place, a critical life lesson and one I did not learn fast enough!
  • Give them a budget for them to cost and plan their own birthday party or major event.
  • Give them a budget to plan, cost and cook a family dinner.
  • Don’t restrict their spending.  My husband always tells me that the best money lesson he ever learnt was spending all his money on the spaceys (as they were known in those days) only to have to survive the rest of the week with no cash.  Let them make mistakes now.  It is much better now than later.
  • Sit them down and explain to them how to read a bill.  Explain to them about different payment options and that some bills are monthly, some quarterly etc.
  • Run them through the amounts of money involved in paying different household bills,  especially the hidden ones such as  insurance and electricity.  Let them know how much things cost, so they don’t get bill shock when they move out of home.
  • Tell them how much your mortgage repayments or rent is every month.
  • Explain how a credit card actually works.
  • Talk about mobile phone plans and how they actually work.

Last but not least, I believe absolutely the BEST way to teach your children about money is to be a good money role model yourself.  As they say actions speak louder than words, and we all know our children are sponges for everything that we say and do.  Let’s face it who hasn’t been shocked by something our child has said or done and thought to ourselves “where on earth did they learn that?”  Model the money behavior that you want your children to learn and you will be successful in creating a confident, financially savvy member of the next generation.

If you liked this post you might also like:

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Disclaimer: The information contained in this post is general in nature and does not constitute financial advice.  Please see your financial adviser for advice specific to your individual circumstances.

10/10/2013 32 comments
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